More on the Sketchbook Project

Less than 2 weeks until my sketchbook is due. I hope to have it shipped to the Brooklyn Art Library before the deadline. If I am honest I will admit that I sometimes work better under pressure. I wrote a little about my choice of themes here. If you are interested in joining the sketchbook project, do it!

Here are some images of my 2018 sketchbook, A Visual Narrative of the Day We Met.

First spread
The centerfold
Still working on this one…it’s the spread..

I enjoyed making this sketch book. It’s a refreshing contrast to the 2017 book. I think I will continue and create another book for 2019. I look forward to the challenge of the next book.

I would love your feedback. As always thank you for reading and checking out my creative process.

My best,
Emily Warren


emilywarrenart.com
www.instagram.com/emmywahwah/
www.saatchiart.com/emilywarren

Color studies in grids

In my mentoring session with Abbey Ryan last October she suggested simplifying areas of my practice. So far, I have tried simplifying my palette and my brushes. I began a new series as a result of the mentoring session. If you are interested in a mentoring session I HIGHLY recommend it.

In an attempt to continually simplify I took a design course through the Continuing Ed department of School of Visual Arts. I have enjoyed the class. The lecture is brief but informative. The assignments are challenging. I am learning and stretching my creative muscles without stressing myself out.

This week we were assigned color grids. Here are 3 color grids using primary and secondary colors.

Primary and secondary color grids.

This grids remind me of quilt blocks. My mother, grandmothers and great grandmothers quilted. I have a wonderful quilt made by my great-great grandmother. I cherish it because of the history. I admire and respect her unique design. I have never seen the pattern in a book or museum. I was told that she dyed the fabric herself. Humbling. I made these grids using Photoshop and Illustrator.

Thank you for liking reading about my art journey.

My best,
Emily Warren


emilywarrenart.com
www.instagram.com/emmywahwah/
www.saatchiart.com/emilywarren

Entry confirmation!

I finally had the time and confidence to enter the Artists Magazine Annual Art Competition. The process wasn’t difficult. The hard part will be waiting until July 31st for results.

I contemplated which painting to submit for months. I decided to enter the Pincushion oil painting. Read more about it here. It is a favorite. I hope to exhibit it at the Nashville Public Library. I think it would look nice displayed alongside an antique Singer sewing machine. The dark wood from an antique Singer machine along with the ivory black background would look picture perfect in the building’s neoclassical mezzanine.

Pincushion, 12×12 inches, oil on wood

This iconic image represents feminism to me. One popular design—a tomato with a strawberry attached—was possibly introduced during the Victorian Era. According to folklore, placing a tomato on the mantel of a new house guaranteed prosperity and repelled evil spirits. If tomatoes were out of season, families improvised by using a round ball of red fabric filled with sand or sawdust. The good-luck symbol also served a practical purpose—a place to store pins. The strawberry contains sand to clean and sharpen needles. It is a universal symbol of womanhood.

$600.00

Thank you so much for liking my work and sharing with your friends.

My best,
Emily Warren


emilywarrenart.com
www.instagram.com/emmywahwah/
www.saatchiart.com/emilywarren

Sketchbook Project

Excuse my mess…

Last year I participated in the Brooklyn Art Library’s Sketchbook Project. It was an elevating experience. I stretched my creative muscles, met the deadline, and grew as an artist. The book is a narrative based on the women’s studies, the momentum of the the Me Too movement, my experience working with high school age students, and figures/natural forms. You can view the 2017 sketchbook here .

This year I signed up to complete a sketchbook for the Brooklyn Art Library again. When I began conceptualizing the book I settled on the idea of disconnection. I began formulating sketches and ideas about living in a digital world fully connected to via social media while highlighting the analogous disconnection associated with the natural world.

In brainstorming sessions about disconnection The imagery that come to mind felt depressed and alone. My painting work is more focused on stillness and calm felling. I just could not create a book all about disconnection without feeling sad. When I abandoned the idea of disconnection, my thought process changed and I decided to tell a visual story using only abstraction. Because I have primary concentrated on realism and illustration in the past, this year’s sketchbook challenge is a delightful and terrifying experience.

Please enjoy some of the previews of the pages.

Below is an example of how I normally paint. Notice a difference?

Pin Cushion

This iconic pin cushion represents femininity to me. One popular design—a tomato with a strawberry attached—was possibly introduced during the Victorian Era. According to folklore, placing a tomato on the mantel of a new house guaranteed prosperity and repelled evil spirits. If tomatoes were out of season, families improvised by using a round ball of red fabric filled with sand or sawdust. The good-luck symbol also served a practical purpose—a place to store pins. The strawberry contains sand to clean and sharpen needles. It is a universal symbol of womanhood.

$600.00

My best,
Emily Warren


emilywarrenart.com
www.instagram.com/emmywahwah/
www.saatchiart.com/emilywarren


Oil in a natural wood frame

Water- 12×12, oil on wood

I finally got around to ordering and framing this painting. I think it looks lovely. I am not pleased with where it currently hangs. It is safe in this location for now.

This Painting has a calming affect on me. I have always loved the water. I love to hear the waves breaking. This painting is silent but it invokes the feelings I love about being on the beach.

My best,
Emily Warren


emilywarrenart.com
www.instagram.com/emmywahwah/

Selling art online

I sold two paintings last week! This is a record number for me. I have one packaged according to Saatchi’s policy: completely wrapped in acid free tissue, bubble wrap, and cardboard. The other painting is to a local person so no bubblewrap. I have printed a lovely certificate of authentication for each.

I must admit it feels great to sell a painting to a total stranger. I wish I could sell more. My inventory is heaped. I want to poll the buyer and ask why and how? Why did she choose the work? What about the piece spoke to her? Is it wrong to ask for data? And what should I ask? I think I will try to come up with an online poll to send to buyers. Not that the results will change my art process but It might change my selling process.

LOOK! It sold.

Thank you for your feedback.

My best,
Emily Warren


emilywarrenart.com
www.instagram.com/emmywahwah/
www.saatchiart.com/emilywarren

Painting upside down

Do you do this? Turn your paintings upside down? I do. I also check my drawings by looking at them in a mirror. I learned this from an Illustration prof at SVA.

Also I am quickly running out of space to store my work. It takes weeks for the oils to dry. I think I will try to find a better solution than storing them on the piano and mantelpiece. I have every intention of painting this weekend but as you can see, my work space is absolutely filled with drying work.

Thank you for reading and following me.

My best,
Emily Warren


emilywarrenart.com
www.instagram.com/emmywahwah/
www.saatchiart.com/emilywarren