Entry confirmation!

I finally had the time and confidence to enter the Artists Magazine Annual Art Competition. The process wasn’t difficult. The hard part will be waiting until July 31st for results.

I contemplated which painting to submit for months. I decided to enter the Pincushion oil painting. Read more about it here. It is a favorite. I hope to exhibit it at the Nashville Public Library. I think it would look nice displayed alongside an antique Singer sewing machine. The dark wood from an antique Singer machine along with the ivory black background would look picture perfect in the building’s neoclassical mezzanine.

Pincushion, 12×12 inches, oil on wood

This iconic image represents feminism to me. One popular design—a tomato with a strawberry attached—was possibly introduced during the Victorian Era. According to folklore, placing a tomato on the mantel of a new house guaranteed prosperity and repelled evil spirits. If tomatoes were out of season, families improvised by using a round ball of red fabric filled with sand or sawdust. The good-luck symbol also served a practical purpose—a place to store pins. The strawberry contains sand to clean and sharpen needles. It is a universal symbol of womanhood.

$600.00

Thank you so much for liking my work and sharing with your friends.

My best,
Emily Warren


emilywarrenart.com
www.instagram.com/emmywahwah/
www.saatchiart.com/emilywarren

Published by Art Belongs to Everyone

Remember Reflect Reform In this work, I have been exploring phenomena of memory augmentation. I experimented with reflections and cinematic images by juxtaposing photographs, paint, wood, and mylar. The direction of the work includes painting intimate, reflective, observations of augmented memories.  I began by building a cabinet of curiosities as a way to form a tableau painting and experiment with different media. Inspired by the relief paintings by artist Sally Han, I built a model of a Victorian cabinet using tenets of Darwin's theory of evolution. I painted on a variety of surfaces including wood, photographs, and adding raw lumber to the pieces. In this process, I disassembled the cabinet to give autonomy to each piece. Although I diverted from the original idea of a final installation, there was an impulse to paint larger. Adding mylar was yet another way to accentuate reflection as a part of the critical dialogue with the work. The final result offers an opportunity to remember, reflect, and reform.

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